Monday, May 30, 2011

New Dietary Guidelines Coming June 2

New Guidelines --- Now What?

Stick with us at LivingAfterWLS and we will work through how the new guidelines work with our "Protein First" dietary requirements. This new dietary icon marks a change in the health strategy promoted by the USDA and we will show you how to make it work for you, your WLS, and your family.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Feta Chicken Salad - Refreshing Summer Fare For Healthy Diets

From today's Weekly Digest

Cooked chicken tossed with fresh vegetables and dressing topped with pungent feta cheese and served over mixed salad greens is an excellent way to enjoy a healthy high protein meal full of flavor and nutrients. Use left-over roast chicken from a previous meal or take advantage of deli rotisserie chicken being careful to remove all skin and bones.

Look for fresh feta cheese in the chilled deli section of most supermarkets. Originating from Greece feta was made by peasants on the lower Balkan peninsula from sheep or goats milk. Feta is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months. It is a crumbly cheese and has a slightly grainy texture. Once removed from the brine it dries out rapidly. For many feta is an acquired taste and the aroma of it has been likened to the smell of bad feet.

It has only been since about 2002 that feta cheese became commonly available in the United States. It is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads, pastries and baking. The classic Greek dish, spanakopita, is a phyllo-crusted spinach pie that features feta cheese combined with olive oil and vegetables and baked. The rich flavor and saltiness of feta helps make a little bit of cheese go a long way.

Nutritionally, feta is a good source of protein, riboflavin, vitamin B12, calcium and phosphorus. A wedge-size serving (1.3 ounces) provides 100 calories, 5 grams protein, 8 grams fat and 424mg of sodium. Feta is high in cholesterol and sodium and very high in saturated fat. It may be included as part of a healthy diet when used in moderation.

Feta Chicken Salad

Traditional chicken salad pumped-up with the flavor of feta cheese. This is satisfyingly delicious made with freshly cooked chicken, store-bought rotisserie chicken or canned chicken. Enjoy on a bed of lettuce.

3 cups diced cooked chicken
2 large stalks celery, diced
1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced
1/2 red onion, diced
6 tablespoons mayonnaise
6 tablespoons sour cream
1 (4 ounce) package feta cheese, crumbled
2 teaspoons dried dill weed
1 pinch salt and pepper to taste
6 cups mixed salad greens

In a serving bowl, mix together the chicken, celery, and red onion. In a separate bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, sour cream, feta cheese, and dill. Pour over the chicken mixture, and stir to blend. Taste, and season with salt and pepper as needed. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until serving. Serve over crispy chilled mixed salad greens.



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Weekly Digest: Summer Living-Having a Post-WLS Blast!

LivingAfterWLS Digest
Summer Living-Having a Post-WLS Blast!
Play Fair, Play Smart, Have Fun! 
May 24,  2011
LivingAfterWLS, LLC - All Rights Reserved

The "official" start of summer is just around the corner with Memorial Day on May 30. For many of us that marks a change in weather and a welcome change in daily routine. Summer brings more time out-of-doors and more gatherings with family and friends. For me summer brings the illusive pursuit of voluptuous overflowing gardens as my mind conjures magazine-worthy flower borders and vegetable beds while my high-elevation climate yields humbling mediocre results. But each year with grit determination I pursue the gardener's dream and make the most of our short season.

I have been gardening for about the same amount of time as I have been living with my weight loss surgery. As a morbidly obese person I read about gardening and admired the gardens of others but my overweight body kept me from actually gardening. I know you can relate because most of us go into surgery looking forward to doing things that our weight has made impossible to do. Since surgery in 1999 I've enjoyed many seasons of gardening and learning. The first year I didn't understand that being in the sunshine and being poorly hydrated would result in dumping syndrome -- the first symptom was dizziness. I didn't know that the sugar in barbecue sauce would make me sick and even cause dumping. And eating healthy all natural grapes one-after-another was a sure way to sugar overdose (see Grapes & Glycemic Index article below). Like a gardener working against the climate to cultivate plants that don't belong I was cultivating practices that didn't work with my WLS. This made my first summer or two after surgery frustrating and sometimes miserable. For me the learning curve - in the garden and with WLS - has been steep.

In today's Weekly Digest we share several articles full of information to improve your summer as you are LIVING after weight loss surgery. I hope your learning curve is shortened as you benefit from my mistakes! So please, take a look and refresh your skills so you can enjoy the summer and thrive!

And if anyone has advice for growing hydrangea or hibiscus at 7,000 feet elevation drop me a note!  

Come Rain or Shine - We are all in this together!
Kaye
KayeBailey@LivingAfterWLS.com

We Support the American Red Cross

Many in this country and around the world have been seriously impacted by natural disaster and weather related devastation in the recent weeks. At LivingAfterWLS we offer our thoughts and prayers for those affected that they may recover quickly and find a renewed sense of living and wellness in the wake of tragedy. We are supporting the efforts of the American Red Cross to help those affected. Please link below to go directly to the Red Cross website to learn about their relief efforts and how we can all do our part.  American Red Cross 

Severe Weather

Monday, May 23, 2011

Mid-Year Update: LivingAfterWLS Weekly Digest Archive

  • LivingAfterWLS Weekly Digest
  • Articles and News from the LivingAfterWLS network. Lots of Content & Connections in every issue! Good Reads! The orange headline links directly to the newsletter conveniently archived online for your reference.

  • Goal Weight Range Part II: Super Morbidly Obese  (5/17/2011)
  • In our weekly digest on May 10th I presented my method for calculating a GWR --Goal Weight Range-- for weight loss rather than a single goal weight. I have developed this formula while working with my fellow weight loss surgery patients so that we may move beyond a randomly selected goal weight to the more important goal of improving our health. In today's digest we look at how GWR may be used for those who fall into the "Extreme Obesity" or "Super Morbidly Obese" category. When a person has a goodly amount of weight to lose they benefit from shaping smaller goals that lead to the greater objective or ultimate goal. When taken alone the ultimate goal (lose 200 pounds, for example) poses an insurmountable climb up a profoundly steep hill. Using GWR Phases allows us to focus on positive changes and adapt a problem-solving approach toward the shortfalls. Weight management is a journey, not a destination. (...) Remember: The objective with GWR is to create an acceptable range based on data and realistic thinking with some positive confidence building opportunities along the way.
  •  
  • The Lies & Myths of Weight Loss Goal Weight  (5/10/2011)
  • Today I'm addressing goal weight as it relates to our experience with weight loss surgery. Prior to surgery patients are in cahoots with their surgeons as they plan for bariatric surgery, set the course and denote the finish line which will be crossed when goal weight is achieved. I don't particularly like to hear what I'm about to say and I know it is a tough thing for my WLS Neighbors to hear, but I'm putting it out there bluntly so we can face it and take action: Few patients will ever reach goal weight.
  •  
  • You Deserve the Royal Treatment  (5/2/2011)
  • I believe that for many of us food has been used in a moral way for most of our lives. When we were children good behavior was rewarded with a cookie. If we were chubby we were put on a punishing diet while those around us who were "good" continued to eat unrestricted. As we matured food has played a significant role in our personal reward and punishment cycle which ultimately led to obesity that required treatment with surgical weight loss.
  •  
  • Delicious Ways to Renew Your Menu  (4/13/2011)
  • Today in the digest we spend a few moments refreshing our memory on how to find a good Day 6 recipe that supports our healthy weight management goals. The more we work toward being masters over what we cook and how we cook the more successful we can become at managing our weight and hopefully improve the health and nourishment of those we love.
  •  
  • Map a Plan to Determine Your WLS Success  (3/27/2011)
  • Wouldn't it be nice if we received a gentle reminder in the mail to spring clean our weight loss surgery house? Here it is! Rather than delay an assessment of our health and weight loss surgery until there is a problem (similar to delaying a visit to the dentist office until we have a toothache) here is our chance to take a look and celebrate what we are getting right, where we have opportunity to improve, and make a map for taking us through the new season. You'll find more about this in the article below that features a favorite LivingAfterWLS tool - the Quarterly Self Assessment. Please accept this gentle reminder to check your health and your weight loss surgery this week. Not many of us are brave enough to go to the market without a list, so why would we hope for the best with our WLS without making a list and a plan? The worksheet is free and it doesn't hurt. And you will be glad you have sprung forward into a new season - It is your time to bloom!
  •  
  • The Four Rules: Should This Be Rule #5?  (2/23/2011)
  • Last week we concluded our four-part Weekly Digest series refresher course of the weight loss surgery Four Rules. You know them by heart: Protein First; Lots of Water; No Snacking; Daily Exercise. I have long wondered, as many of you have, why taking our vitamin supplements is not part of the near-sacred list that is used almost universally by bariatric centers around the world. After all, we are instructed at length about our need for vitamins supplementation after a gastric weight loss surgery, particularly if we have undergone an malabsorptive procedure. So in keeping with our review of the daily activities that support and sustain our health after surgery today we look at Vitamin Supplements . Join me in making this your unwritten Rule #5 for good health and wellness after weight loss surgery.
  •  
  • Rule #4 - Most of Us Struggle with This One  (2/18/2011)
  • In this Digest we present several articles and inspiration for following Rule #4. For me exercise never comes easily and I will not make an empty promise that it can come easily for you. But I will say with deep conviction that I consistently feel better on the days I exercise versus the days I do not. And I believe you enjoy the same good feelings of health and wellness on good exercise days. I'm sure many of you can remember back when Jane Fonda lead us in our at-home video workouts with the battle cry, "Make it Burn!" Recently at age 73 she released a new workout video and made this revealing comment, "I don't like to exercise. I do it because the reward is so delicious and worthwhile. It's not like I wake up saying Oh, goodie! Time to work out!" -- Jane Fonda
  •  
  • Rule #3 No Snacking - Here's Where We Get in Trouble  (2/9/2011)
  • Today we continue our discussion of the Four Rules - we are at Number 3: No Snacking. It's a tough one and I dare say most of will or have struggled with snacking following weight loss surgery. And, as you will see from the articles in this newsletter, not all bariatric centers follow the same Four Rules that include no snacking. But what is consistent, across the front lines of those of us living with weight loss surgery, is that out-of-control snacking on poorly chosen foods leads to a stall in weight loss and may possibly lead to weight gain. So please, take a look at the information here and revisit the information you were provided at the time of your surgery. Find your personal position on the "No Snacking" rule based on knowledge, experience, and environment -- it is the most empowering thing you can do for yourself in this ongoing battle of weight management in a world where it is much easier to be fat.
  •  
  • Rule #2 Lots of Water - When did water get so complicated?  (2/2/2011)
  • Today's LivingAfterWLS Digest is the second in our New Year's refresher series about the Four Rules. We are looking at Rule #2 - Lots of Water. Water consumption and weight loss is old news to those of us who are lifelong dieters. We know drinking water flushes away toxins and facilitates weight loss. As weight loss surgery patients we must make water intake a priority, but we also have to manage water intake around our quirky liquid restrictions. Frankly it can be a hassle sometimes to meet the daily requirements of Rule #2 - Lots of Water. Today's digest features several articles about the hows and whys of water consumption. Take a minute to fill your glass right now and then refresh your memory on this important rule. Remember, when we signed on for surgery we agreed to follow these rules -- for life! Bottoms up!
  •  
  • Protein First: Why it Works, How to Get Enough  (1/20/2011)
  • In the spirit of the New Year today, and for the next three issues of "Weekly Digest" we are taking a closer look at the Four Rules - starting with Rule #1 Protein First. In short - Protein First means it should be the first nutrient we eat at any meal and it should account for the highest percentage of nutrients eaten over fat, carbohydrates and alcohol. In order to maintain weight loss and keep the obesity from which we suffer in remission we must follow these rules for life. When we meet patients who have maintained a healthy body weight for several years with weight loss surgery we learn that in most cases they live by the Four Rules.
  •  
  • Weight Loss Surgery Split Personality Syndrome  (1/4/2011)
  • I believe this is the most important message I can share with you right now and one that will make a difference in how you feel about yourself and your health and your weight loss surgery. ... So please, accept with an open heart my conversation on the WLS-Split Personality Syndrome*. Let me know if it hits the mark for you. Because once we see it and know it is exists, understanding begins and so does the healing. We did not choose the medical condition of morbid obesity for ourselves; but we most certainly can choose the path of healing and longevity for ourselves. Read the newsletter - Link Above.

Friday, May 20, 2011

While Supplies Last -- Yours FREE!

We have a few of these terrific Deluxe Goody Bags left over from our Mother's Day promotion so we are including them FREE with any order in the LivingAfterWLS General Store over $50. Terrific value & Fun Fun Fun!!! While supplies last. Shop now!



Includes: Know Your Numbers Journal; Worksheets; Trio-Nuts, Seeds & Fruit snack bar; 3 Samples Triple Leaf Tea; 2 Samples Emergen-C; You Have Arrived Magnet & Four Rules Magnet; Four Rules Wallet Card. Packaged in a dainty soft vinyl tote with snap floral closure and tube handles adorned with feather boa accent and lined with angel hair iridescent shred.



Beautiful & Inspiring!
Our way of wishing you the best in your WLS experience!
Free with orders of $50 or More.
Value: $13.64
To Purchase Link Here: Fun Stuff

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Weekly Digest: Goal Weight Range for Super Morbidly Obese


Read the  full newsletter in our Archive: Digest May 17, 2011

In our weekly digest on May 10th I presented my method for calculating a GWR --Goal Weight Range-- for weight loss rather than a single goal weight. I have developed this formula while working with my fellow weight loss surgery patients so that we may move beyond a randomly selected goal weight to the more important goal of improving our health. In today's digest we look at how GWR may be used for those who fall into the "Extreme Obesity" or "Super Morbidly Obese" category. When a person has a goodly amount of weight to lose they benefit from shaping smaller goals that lead to the greater objective or ultimate goal. When taken alone the ultimate goal (lose 200 pounds, for example) poses an insurmountable climb up a profoundly steep hill. Using GWR Phases allows us to focus on positive changes and adapt a problem-solving approach toward the shortfalls. Weight management is a journey, not a destination.

If you fall into one of the heavier categories of BMI please take a look at the GWR Phases as detailed below. I think you will have a new enthusiasm for setting and achieving goals when they are based on rational data to target attainable milestones. 


Remember: The objective with GWR is to create an acceptable range based on data and realistic thinking with some positive confidence building opportunities along the way.

Over the years I've heard all kinds of rationale for the randomly selected goal weights people pursue. Just to lighten the mood here are a few of the outrageous and irrelevant reasons people have shared for setting their goal weight. Usually these statements follow the disclaimer, "I know it is silly but..." 

"I want to get to 120 pounds and size 6 because it sounds so wonderful just saying it: I weigh 120 pounds and wear a size 6. I love how that sounds!" 
-- 31 year old woman, starting weight 285, BMI 49 

"I want to get to 135 pounds so I can weigh less than my twin sister who has never had a weight problem."
--44 year old woman, starting weight 238, BMI 41 

"I want to get back to 160 pounds, that's what I weighed when I left the Army and I was in the best shape of my life." --Six-Foot tall 58 year old man, starting weight 327 pounds, BMI 47  

 "My class reunion is next summer and I want to weigh less than I did at graduation 20 years ago so my goal is 140 pounds."
--38 year old woman, starting weight 278, BMI 45

   These reasons do sound silly when put in writing, but honestly, I know I had a few silly things that motivated my weight loss including revenge against all the mean girls who teased me in high school. Perhaps you too are fueled by a few non-health related goals. So while we can harness the energy that comes from silly motivation it is also important to set viable goals based on improved health and greater rewards. These are the things that will sustain us on the long journey when the rewards of silliness become trite.  

Happy Spring - We are all in this together!
Kaye
KayeBailey@LivingAfterWLS.com

Other articles in the May 17, 2011 Digest
Last week when we published the weekly digest about Goal Weight Range rather than pursing a single goal weight we received a tremendous amount of feedback both favorable and critical. One thing I failed to include in the previous newsletter was applying the GWR principles in phases to facilitate weight loss for people who fall in the clinical definition of "Extreme Obesity" having a BMI of greater than 40. Patients faced with a tremendous amount of weight to lose benefit from the behavioral technique called "shaping" in which a series of short-term goals are set and met bringing them closer to the ultimate goal. Below is a Question & Answer from the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood that addresses the question of Goal Weight Range as it is applied to the super-morbidly obese: 
Read More

Monday, May 16, 2011

Older People NOT at Greater Risk of Complications with WLS

Neighborhood Conversation on Topic

Recent studies published on WebMD last week indicate that older patients undergoing weight loss surgery are at no greater risk for complications from surgery than younger patients. The broad canvas study of more than 48,000 WLS patients found that, "adults over 65 were not at significantly greater risk of experiencing a major adverse event or dying within a month of their surgeries compared to those in their 30s and 40s, though seniors were more likely to face longer hospital stays." That is good news at a time when more and more older Americans are prolonging life and improving quality of life by weight reduction with Weight Loss Surgery. The full article is below.

Sadly, the study did not report data for post-surgical data beyond the initial 30 days following surgery. It would be interesting to learn the rate of illness recovery for this age set including the reduced signs and symptoms of arthritis, asthma, sleep apnea, bone and joint pain and loss of mobility. I am also curious is the weight loss outcome (pounds lost) is comparable to patients in younger age groups.

In my work with WLS patients of all ages I've observed some age-group specific trends or behaviors that are fascinating. My observations are purely that - observation without scientific foundation by which to draw conclusions. As I share them here please consider them as insight and not necessarily an expectation for how any individual might respond to surgery based on their age group. Here are some things I've seen in patients of WLS who are 50 or older at the time of surgery:

  • Older patients are health driven more than appearance driven in their pursuit of weight loss.

  • Older patients are less inclined to include physical activity as part of their weight reduction effort. This is often due to mobility issues, old injuries, emotional feelings about exercising in public, or pain and discomfort associated with arthritis and age related skeletal disease.

  • Goal objectives for older patients often include improved quality of life; longevity desires "I want to see my grandchildren grow to adults";  desire to reduce debilitating health issues including mobility, risks of heart disease and stroke, diabetes, and early death.

  • Older patients, particularly those who have dieted frequently for weight loss, are prone to the conventional dieting traps: assigning moral values to food (good food vs. bad food); sneaking a treat as a reward or finding loopholes to beat the diet. Even with weight loss surgery in their tool belt older patients are more prone than younger patients to believe in weight loss gimmicks and they frequently add media-hyped supplements or other "quick fix" options to their weight loss surgery program.

  • Older patients tend to be more satisfied with the results of their weight loss surgery and less critical of their body as weight is lost resulting in pronounced wrinkles and excess loose skin. They seem to show fewer signs of body dysmorphic disorder than younger patients who tend to focus on the ideal perfect body rather than improved health and quality of life.

  • Older patients tend to be extremely grateful for surgical help in fighting morbid obesity. After years of frustration they are genuinely happy to be treated for the condition thoughtfully by the medical establishment. Many report that earlier attempts at weight loss were often shunned by their medical care providers and many say they were told by their doctors to lose weight without instructions for how to do it.

  • Every person over 50 that I have spoken with regarding their weight loss surgery has said without hesitation, "I only wish I'd done it sooner."

These are just a few of my observations. I know that many of you out there are over 50 and LIVING with Weight Loss Surgery. I'd love to hear about your experience. Please visit this thread in the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood to connect with others & share your Golden Years WLS Story!

Below is the full article from WebMD:

Weight Loss Surgery May Benefit Older Adults

Study Shows Weight Loss Surgery Is Safe and Effective for Patients Over 65
By Brenda Goodman
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

May 9, 2011 -- Age does not appear to significantly increase the risks associated with having weight loss surgery, a new study shows.

The study analyzed data on more than 48,000 adults in a national registry who had open or laparoscopic bariatric surgery procedures between 2005 and 2009.  Over that period, the percentage of adults over age 65 who had surgery to lose weight more than doubled.

Researchers found that adults over 65 were not at significantly greater risk of experiencing a major adverse event or dying within a month of their surgeries compared to those in their 30s and 40s, though seniors were more likely to face longer hospital stays.

“If the patient is over age 65, and they’re otherwise relatively healthy, I think this study gives surgeons an opportunity to tell the patients that they can undergo these operations with relatively similar outcomes compared to younger age populations,” says study researcher Robert B. Dorman, MD, PhD, a general surgery resident at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis.
The study was presented at Digestive Disease Week 2011 in Chicago.

“There’s been a fairly dramatic increase nationally in offering bariatric surgery to older patients, and I think their study is important in that as we offer surgery to older patients, we need to make sure that outcomes are still safe and that offering surgery to this older population makes sense,” says Thomas H. Magnuson, MD, director of the Johns Hopkins Obesity Surgery Service in Baltimore.

“Older patients definitely benefit from the operation oftentimes more in terms of quality of life. If you can have someone who is 72 years old lose 100 pounds, they can get better quality of life, such as, you know flying on an airplane with their grandkids or just getting around better to enjoy life,” says Magnuson, who was not involved in the research.

Older patients, like younger patients, may also see improvements in medical conditions related to obesity, like type 2 diabetes, he says.

Weight Loss Surgery in Older Adults

For the study, researchers analyzed the records of 48,378 bariatric surgery patients that were collected by hospitals around the U.S. through the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

Patients included in the study had body mass indexes (BMIs) over 35. Each had undergone one of the following procedures: an open or laparoscopic gastric bypass, an open duodenal switch, laparoscopic gastric banding, or a vertical banded gastroplasty. Seventy-two people died during the study. Eight were over age 65. The risk of dying within 30 days of bariatric surgery was 0.12% for adults aged 35 to 49, 0.21% for those aged 50 to 64, and 0.4% for those over age 65.

After researchers took into account a host of factors thought to affect the outcome of weight loss surgery, including weight, gender, heart disease, diabetes, and kidney function, they found that risk of death for seniors was not statistically significant, meaning that the numbers didn’t show a true difference.

Compared to middle-aged adults, older adults also did not appear to be at any increased risk of having major adverse events, like heart attacks, strokes, and serious infections, after their procedures.
Seniors did have longer hospital stays than younger adults, however, especially if they were over age 70 and the procedure involved opening the abdomen.

Prolonged hospital stays were considered to be anything over three days for a laparoscopic procedure and anything over six days after an open surgery.

Adults aged 65 to 69 had a 20% increased risk of a prolonged hospital stay after a laparoscopic procedure and an 80% increased risk of a prolonged hospital stay after an open procedure compared to those younger than 50.

For those over 70, there was no increased risk after a laparoscopic procedure, but a more than fourfold higher risk of a prolonged hospital stay after an open procedure.
“We tend to focus on younger patients, but obesity affects younger people as well as older people,” Magnuson says.

“Studies like this point out that indeed the risk of surgery isn’t any greater in carefully selected elder patients than younger patients,” he tells WebMD.

For bariatric surgery patients of any age, things that did appear to predict the likelihood of a poor outcome included having type 2 diabetes, being a man, or having a BMI over 55, Dorman says.

Correction: Free Goody Bag Offer Still Open!



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Sunday, May 15, 2011

Featured Products: LivingAfterWLS General Store

booksBariatric Nurse Recommends Kaye Bailey's Books to All Patients 
     "As a support group leader and bariatric nurse, and myself a 7-year veteran of gastric bypass, I recommend Kaye Bailey's books and products to my patients. For someone new to weight loss surgery as well as the veteran patient Ms. Bailey presents a compassionate look at the ups and downs of weight loss surgery. She kindly teaches and encourages with calm sensibility and proven techniques to make the most of WLS. I have taught new patients the 5 Day Pouch Test, not so they can do it to accelerate weight loss, but so they can truly learn to stay on track by understanding the behaviors that get us off track in the first place. When I am down I find myself thumbing through "Day 6" for that nugget of information that always seems to be there when I need it. Thanks Kaye for your terrific insight and kind manner of encouragement and understanding."
    Nancy Ellen Barnett, RN, RD

Books by Kaye BaileyPut the Power of the Pouch in your hands with Kaye Bailey's two best selling books: The 5 Day Pouch Test Owner's Manual (2008; Third Printing 2011) and Day 6: Beyond the 5 Day Pouch Test (2009). Over 300 pages of inspiration, motivation, empowerment and know-how to get you on track with weight loss surgery and keep you there! Great recipes, inspiring hints and divine secrets! Spoken in Kaye's compelling voice of compassion and "You Can Do This" spirit. SKU #1241714797  
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 teaNEW!!
Traditional Herbal Teas by Triple Leaf
Herbal Tea
LivingAfterWLS is pleased to present products to you that we have found supportive in our quest for better health and weight management with weight loss surgery. We are particularly excited to introduce three formulas of Triple Leaf Herbal Tea that support digestive wellness naturally in the practice of ancient Chinese medicine.


Message from Kaye
I admit that I've never been much of a tea drinker: too fancy and too fussy for me it seems. But I am grateful to have found these herbal tea blends and include them in my diet frequently. Like many weight loss surgery patients I suffer from frequent digestive distress (constipation). Constipation is commonly associated with a high protein diet. In my search for relief I tried all manner of over the counter medicine only to find myself a bathroom-hostage suffering extreme cramping and loss of control. I'm sure many of you understand this plight. Along the way a bariatric nutritionist recommended laxative tea to me for more gentle relief. It Works! A warm cup of dilute tea before bed at night works gently without cramping or other unpleasant side effects of pharmeceutical constipation relief. A quick stop in the bathroom first thing in the morning and I'm good for the day. I like to make a batch of weak tea with three tea bags seeping  in 8 cups of hot (not boiling) water for about 10 minutes. After it cools I refrigerate it in a tightly sealed glass container. A Mason jar works very well. For my nightly serving I heat a measured 1 cup of brewed tea gently in the microwave and add a teaspoon of honey. A squeeze of lemon is also nice. If you suffer from the constipation associated with weight loss surgery and have struggled to find relief I do hope you will try this tea. Each all natural formula provides digestive support in the ancient Chinese tradition.

Natural Gentle Constipation & Digestive Relief 
Our selection of Triple Leaf Teas are beneficial to the health of those with gastric weight reduction surgery suffering from frequent constipation. Suggested serving: 1 cup after dinner, not to exceed 2 cups in 24 hours. Useful in cleansing and relief of constipation associated with the high protein weight loss surgery diet. Individually packaged in single serving tea bags made in the USA. Herbal dietary supplement.


Bargain Collection:
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Try all three varieties and enjoy a healthier digestive system without the drama of pharmaceutical cleanses or laxatives. Four servings of each variety for an even dozen cups of delicious healthy tea.
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Last Day: Free Deluxe Goody Bag with Purchase

LivingAfterWLS General Store

The road traveled with weight loss surgery is never easy:
That is why we are here to support you!
To show our dedication to your improved health we are giving our customers a darling and thoughtful Deluxe Goody Bag full of things to support your journey
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Deluxe Goody BagYour Deluxe Goody Bag includes: Know Your Numbers Journal; Worksheets; Trio-Nuts, Seeds & Fruit snack bar; 3 Samples Triple Leaf Tea; 2 Samples Emergen-C; You Have Arrived Magnet & Four Rules Magnet; Four Rules Wallet Card. Packaged in a dainty soft vinyl tote with snap floral closure and tube handles adorned with feather boa accent and lined with angel hair iridescent shred. 

Beautiful & Inspiring!
Our way of wishing you the best in your WLS experience! 


Free with orders of $50 or More.
Value: $13.64


To Purchase a Deluxe Goody Bag Link Here:

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

BMI Calculator

Use this BMI Calculator from the CDC to find the BMI data points you need for the Goal Weight Range worksheet featured in the LivingAfterWLS Digest May 10, 2011. Read the newsletter here: Lies & Myth of Goal Weight and download the Free Worksheet to find your Goal Weight Range. This is a new and empowering way to map the course of healthy weight management with weight loss surgery.

The Lies & Myth of Goal Weight

LivingAfterWLS Weekly Digest
May 10, 2011

Today I'm addressing goal weight as it relates to our experience with weight loss surgery. Prior to surgery patients are in cahoots with their surgeons as they plan for bariatric surgery, set the course and denote the finish line which will be crossed when goal weight is achieved. I don't particularly like to hear what I'm about to say and I know it is a tough thing for my WLS Neighbors to hear, but I'm putting it out there bluntly so we can face it and take action:

Few patients will ever reach goal weight.

There you have it. Numerous studies suggest that fewer than 20% of patients achieve goal weight. My work with patients of all gastric surgeries for weight management suggests the same thing. In fact, it is fairly common for me to meet someone who introduces themselves saying, "I'm one of those people who never made it to goal weight." Here is what you need to know about goal weight so it will cease to be a barrier to your pursuit of overall health.

Know This Truth:
It is the random method of determining goal weight that is flawed; it is not the patient who is flawed.


Goal weight is a random data point set arbitrarily with reference to standardized tables that are irrelevant to an individual's health history, age, co-morbidities and genetic profile. In most cases the goal weight creates unrealistic expectations for the patient. When patients do not achieve this random point of measure called goal weight they consider themselves a failure and "one of those people." Patients become hopeless and frustrated. These feelings almost always lead to rebound weight gain.





Why do we use weight as a measure of health?
From the time of our birth when proud parents happily announce our weight and height and throughout our life these two data points (weight and height) are used to assess our health. The reason? Cost and convenience. Collecting these two measurements is easy and cheap. Most medical professionals agree that the current standards for body weight measured by weight in relation to height (called BMI-Body Mass Index) does little to reflect disease risk, identify body fat, and in general presents a misleading argument for overall health. In reality, the most these data points reveal is change without indicating a decline or improvement in health. Yet we are encouraged with weight loss surgery, and by conventional diet programs as well, to focus on a goal weight that may have very little to do with the health of our body.





Today we go beyond goal weight to help you achieve better results that are health focused.

Please join me with an open mind as we look at goal weight as it is used by weight loss surgery patients. Bear in mind that I'm not anti-goal weight. I am simply sharing the knowledge I have collected in building my understanding of how such a tight focus on goal weight results in difficulty and disappointment for many patients. As you read with an open mind add this knowledge to your personal experience and understanding. You are a powerful person. Harness your strength and intelligence as you engage in the pursuit of  better health and better living with weight loss surgery.

This is a longer newsletter than our normal weekly digest. I know we are all limited on time and asking you to read this may be a burden. But the content here is very important to your life-long healthy weight management. I hope you find it worth your while. 


Happy Spring - We are all in this together!
Kaye
KayeBailey@LivingAfterWLS.com

Monday, May 09, 2011

Equipment Upgrade: Outages Possible

Greetings LivingAfterWLS Neighbors! Hope you are well this morning. FYI-we are completing our equipment upgrade for LivingAfterWLS & associated websites today. This may result in temporary outages of The Neighborhood, LivingAfterWLS.com & 5DayPouchTest.com Be assured the Tech Team will take every action to make this a smooth & invisible transition. I'm a nervous wreck over this kind thing. Will Post Updates on Facebook. And for more details and real-time updates follow this conversation in the Neighborhood:

Monday May 9, 2011- Equipment Upgrade

New Clues on Caffeine’s Health Benefits

In the ongoing discussion about coffee and the role it plays in our diet WebMD presents new evidence that suggests coffee's notorious bad-boy element CAFFEINE does good things: specifically destroying the free radicals associated with Alzheirmer's and heart disease. Take a look at the article below. In diet and nutrition I'm not sure any other substance comes close to coffee when weighing the health promoting vs. health risking attributes.

When it comes to coffee and intake related to weight loss surgery my personal belief is a bit glib: to each their own. If caffeinated coffee boosts your energy and alertness without causing anxiety or jitters it is probably okay to include it as a part of your regular diet. However if one cup sends you over the edge causing jittery hyper-active anxiety inducing feelings perhaps it is best left out of your diet. Of course, during the first year following weight loss surgery patients should work closely with their bariatric center following the advice of a nutritionist regarding coffee, caffeine and all dietary intake. Me, I'm good with two cups of fresh brewed coffee each morning. Remember, you are the best judge of your day-to-day health. Stay informed and aware and make the best decisions you can one cup at a time. Time for the first cup of the day!



From WebMD on May 6, 2011
New Clues on Caffeine’s Health Benefits

New Clues on Caffeine’s Health Benefits

Study Suggests Antioxidants in Caffeine Play a Role in Coffee’s Impact on Health
By Jennifer Warner
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
coffee cup among coffee beans
May 6, 2011 -- Caffeine's jolt may do more than just keep you awake. A new study supports the health benefits of coffee by showing how the antioxidants in caffeine fight damage-causing free radicals.

Researchers say their experiments explain the chemistry of how the antioxidants in caffeine seek out and destroy free radicals associated with Alzheimer's and heart disease.
Free radicals are molecules in the body that attack healthy cells and cause damage that can lead to disease. The health benefits of antioxidants are largely due to their effects in protecting against damage from these free radicals.

Recent studies have shown that coffee is one of the richest sources of antioxidants in the average person's diet. But little is known about how these antioxidants, including caffeine, work against free radicals.

In the study, published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, researcher Jorge Rafael Leon-Carmona of Universidad Autnoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, in Mexico, evaluated the five different theoretical mechanisms of the chemical reaction between the antioxidants in caffeine and free radicals.

They found that a mechanism called the radical adduct formation (RAF) is the main mechanism involved in caffeine's ability to protect against damage from free radicals, which is consistent with previous studies in animals.

Researchers say the results support the notion that caffeine is a major source of antioxidant activity in coffee.
Article Source: WebMD

 Thoughtful Conversations in the Neighborhood

Link to these conversations in the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood to learn how others include coffee and protein coffee in their healthy weight loss surgery diet:


Protein Coffee: "I love the idea of protein coffee. When I drink cafe o'lei in the morning, it fills me up pretty well - but there isn't a whole lot of nutrition there. Is there a good protein that has NO SWEETENER in it I could use? I like my coffee very milky - but not at all sweet." -- EveB


Mels Protein Coffee & Hot Chocolate.  From Melsreturn: "Several of you are asking about protein coffee or hot protein drinks. I posted in another thread, but thought this one deserves its very own (and put into the Diet, Nutrition, Supplements category for future reference).  Now for protein coffee... There is a trick to this. But here is my favorite:" Go to Discussion

Sunday, May 08, 2011

Limited Time: Free Gift from LivingAfterWLS General Store

LivingAfterWLS General Store - Shop Now!

LivingAfterWLS and Kaye Bailey are pleased you have chosen to make us part of your long-term success with weight loss surgery. We are committed to supporting you with quality products to enhance your life and empower your success.
Mother's Day Offer!
Deluxe Good Bag
$13.65 Value
Free with $50 Purchase!!

Deluxe Goody Bag
Includes: Know Your Numbers Journal; Worksheets; Trio-Nuts, Seeds & Fruit snack bar; 3 Samples Triple Leaf Tea; 2 Samples Emergen-C; You Have Arrived Magnet & Four Rules Magnet; Four Rules Wallet Card. Packaged in a dainty soft vinyl tote with snap floral closure and tube handles adorned with feather boa accent and lined with angel hair iridescent shred.
Beautiful & Inspiring!
Our way of wishing you the best in your WLS experience!
Free with orders of $50 or More.
Value: $13.64

Books ~ Soups ~ Seasoning Blends ~ 5 Day Pouch Test

Warm Wishes for Mother's Day

As we honor Mothers and Motherhood today please accept my heartfelt wishes for a day of joy and memory making as you celebrate the special relationships in your life. Thank you for being a treasured part of my life through our LivingAfterWLS connection.

"Let us be grateful to people who make us happy, they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom."
-Marcel Proust

For You I am Grateful,
Have a Blessed Day.
Kaye Bailey
LivingAfterWLS, LLC

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Understanding Weight Gain After Weight Loss Surgery

I am hearing from many WLS Neighbors who are struggling to get to goal weight or fighting back against a weight gain. If you are struggling - as we all do at times - please take a look at my article below that reveals 4 truths about regain and empowers you to understand why it happens to even those most resolved to beat obesity once and for all:

From 5 Day Pouch Test Featured Articles:



Four Truths About Weight Regain After Weight Loss Surgery
"Nobody undergoes weight loss surgery thinking weight regain will happen to them. But statistics indicate that 80 percent of those who undergo gastric bypass, gastric banding, or gastric sleeve weight loss surgery will at some point regain some of the weight they lost initially with the surgery. Learn four truths about weight gain after weight loss surgery."


 By Kaye Bailey

I was born with the disease obesity and by the time I was out of college it had advanced to morbid obesity. At age 33 my disease was treated with gastric bypass surgery which affected a loss of weight that put my disease, morbid obesity, in remission. Three years later I suffered a relapse of my disease with a weight gain of 20 pounds. Through dietary and lifestyle compliance, much like a person with heart disease who suffers a relapse, I was able to put my disease, obesity, back in remission. I will always have the disease of morbid obesity and am fortunate that I was able, at a young age, to be treated with the best medically available option.

The Facts:
  • Obesity is a disease.
  • Weight loss puts the disease in remission.
  • Weight gain puts the disease in relapse.
  • Like most diseases, victims of obesity are responsible to make dietary and lifestyle changes that work with medical treatment to keep our disease in remission.
  • Like most diseases, relapses occur, obesity manifests relapse in weight gain.
  • We are not the disease, we have the disease.

My Four Truths:
Regain Is Likely: It is generally believed that 80% of people who undergo weight loss surgery (WLS) will experience weight gain (relapse) of 10-30 pounds depending upon initial weight loss. It is further believed that 20% of those will relapse to their former weight and possibly gain more as the disease of morbid obesity advances. This relapse can be the result of failed gastric surgery (the surgery was improperly performed or medical device failure); a non-compliant patient who does not evolve their eating and exercise habits; the active intestine becoming more efficient at absorbing calories; and potential stomach pouch stretch. Dr. Anita Courcoulas, chief of minimally invasive bariatric and general surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center said, "Regaining weight down the road is a common phenomenon for weight loss patients. These patients need to be educated and prepared for it if it happens."

100% Conviction: It is my experience that 100% of patients who take to the operating table for the treatment of their disease say, "I'm not going to be one of those people who gain weight after surgery." You can bet the farm I said that - and imagine my embarrassment and shame when I did in fact become one of those people. At the time I didn't understand my disease had relapsed, in part because I had relaxed my newly evolved eating and exercise habits, but also because my body has a disease that wants to store excess fat. I thought I gained weight because I was a failure at surgery.

I failed AGAIN! I am not alone in my feelings of failure over weight regain. Dr. Courcoulas said, "These are people who feel that they have failed at everything they tried in their lives. If they feel that they are failing surgery, they're embarrassed and they don't want to come back for help." How sad for us. When a cancer patient suffers a relapse do they take it as a personal failure? I sure hope not. Popular media perpetuates the belief that weight gain equals failure. WLS celebrities are splashed across mainstream media and tabloids alike for weight regain. But the celebrity with cancer who suffers relapse? Charity benefits are hosted bearing their name and their bravery is lauded. With a relapse in obesity the celebrity becomes the brunt of jokes for late night comedians. No wonder we don't want to become one of those people but statistics are not on our side

I Am Not Obese. Since kindergarten the word "fat" defined me and I actually thought that was who I was because "You are fat" and "I am fat" were constant phrases in my world. By about age 40 I finally figured out that I am not fat. I have obesity, a disease. Have you heard a heart attack patient say, "I am heart disease" or a leukemia patient say, "I am cancer"? We are not the disease! We have a disease that is part of the whole person that makes us the wonderfully unique and powerful person we are. View YouTube: I am me, not my disease

Relapse to Remission: Just like other diseases, obesity relapse can be put into remission. There is hope! As noted above there are (at least) four reasons for relapse including: failed gastric surgery; a non-compliant patient who does not evolve their eating and exercise habits; the active intestine becoming more efficient at absorbing calories; and potential stomach pouch stretch. Keeping in mind that statistically weight regain is likely, that you are not a failure, and that you are not the disease, you can pragmatically go about mapping a plan to fight your relapse.
  •       Seek medical help and treatment: you are fighting a killer disease
  •       Assess your eating and exercise evolution and return to the lifestyle prescribed at the time of surgery
  •       Educate yourself on nutrition, physical and spiritual health so they may work in harmony to heal your body
  •       Seek support, family, friends, community, and fellow patients to help maintain your personal motivation
  •       Educate others to stop the ignorance and blame and promote the understanding of this illness we are fighting.
If you have experienced weight regain or simply need to get back on track please visit the 5 Day Pouch Test website. Thousands of people have gone back to the basics of weight loss surgery with the plan and have successfully used it as a powerful tool in their weight management with weight loss surgery.

Alert: Recalled Grape Tomatoes in Ready-to-Eat Salads

Many of us include vitamin packed fresh tomatoes as part of our weight loss surgery diet for their easy digestibility and high water content. Today in the news we have been alerted to an outbreak of salmonella in fresh tomatoe. Please take a moment to review this article from WebMD and evaluate your risk. This contamination scare coupled with the recent drastic increase in the price of tomatoes has many of us keeping them off the menu. However using canned tomatoes and canned tomato products such as marinara sauce provides the same nutrients --including health promoting lycopene-- as fresh tomatoes. Try this quick and affordable recipe for Huevos Rancheros, a traditional egg breakfast with a Mexican twist. It is simple and delicious and makes a very good weeknight supper for the whole family using canned tomatoes and other pantry-handy ingredients.

From the LivingAfterWLS Library:
Healthy Eating: Tomatoes
by Kaye Bailey

After weight loss surgery it is important to include as many healthy foods in our diet as possible while still respecting the the restrictive nature gastric bypass system. One of the foods that many patients report having a high tolerance for is tomatoes. It's well known that a high intake of tomato products is associated with lowered risk of colon and prostate cancers, a beneficial effect thought to be due to tomatoes high content of the carotenoids, lycopene and beta-carotene. Read More


Recalled Grape Tomatoes in Ready-to-Eat Salads
Recalled Grape Tomatoes in Ready-to-Eat Salads
Salmonella Fears Spur Recall of Popular Garden, Seafood, Chicken Salads
By Daniel J. DeNoon
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

May 3, 2011 – Grape tomatoes possibly contaminated with salmonella have found their way into ready-to-eat salads sold by Albertsons, Raley's, Safeway, Savemart, Sam's Club, and Walmart stores.

The grape tomatoes had been recalled on April 29 by Six L's of Immokalee, Fla. The recalled lot of grape tomatoes were sold under the brand name Cherry Berry and marked with the lot code DW-H. They were sold in clamshell packages as well as in 20-pound cardboard containers.

The grape tomatoes were distributed in 10 states and in Canada, but then spread out through retail and restaurant distribution.

Yesterday, Taylor Farms Pacific Inc. of Tracey, Calif., recalled salad products it had made using the recalled grape tomatoes.

The salad products include seafood salads, Mediterranean salads, green salads, quinoa salads, orzo salads, salads with chicken, chef salads, Cobb salads, Greek salads, and mozzarella salads.

The grape tomatoes originally were distributed in Canada and in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.

Read Full Article


Monday, May 02, 2011

LivingAfterWLS Weekly Digest: Royal Treatment

Link to the Newsletter Archive: May 2, 2011
From today's LivingAfterWLS Weekly Digest Newsletter:

Greetings Neighbors!

Were you among those who enjoyed watching the Royal Wedding of Prince William to Catherine Middleton last week? I confess to pulling an all-nighter just to watch it! It seems we are obsessed with all things royal. I cannot help but wonder that while we enjoy watching the spectacle of royalty perhaps we are privately wishing for a little bit of royal treatment in our own lives. Who wouldn't like to be pampered and coddled: every wish granted expertly and efficiently? I don't see that lifestyle in my future but I do know there are things we can do to pamper ourselves in the act of nurturing a stronger healthier being. Today's "Weekly Digest" celebrates you with simple ideas for royal treatment. I hope you enjoy and look forward to learning how you take time out for the Royal Treatment! Read Article

Gastric Sleevers: Welcome to LivingAfterWLS
In the weight loss surgery community we are seeing more patients undergoing the gastric sleeve procedure. Many "Sleevers" have joined our LivingAfterWLS network recently and I personally wish to welcome you here. I believe you will find the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood to be one of the few prejudice-free zones for connecting with other WLSers on the Internet. We welcome all people to our community regardless of weight or weight management method. As the sleeve procedure becomes more common I hope our Sleevers will grow in numbers and actively share their experience so that we may continue to build our body of knowledge for healthy weight management. I invite you to participate in all the Neighborhood discussions and point you to the Heart on Your Sleeve forum dedicated to the gastric sleeve procedure.

Follow this path:The Neighborhood >> Town Square Knowledge Center >> WLS Chat >> Heart on Your Sleeve

A special forum dedicated to those who undergo gastric sleeve procedures. Named "Heart on Your Sleeve" because so many of us invest our hope and our hearts in a procedure to take back our life. Please share you knowledge and experience here.

To learn more about the gastric sleeve procedure read this article: Benefits of Sleeve Gastrectomy in the Treatment of Morbid Obesity featured in today's Weekly Digest. 

Happy Spring - We are all in this together!
Kaye
KayeBailey@LivingAfterWLS.com

Other Featured Articles:

In This Digest
Free iPhone App: Connect with the Neighborhood
Social Connections
Benefits of Sleeve Gastrectomy
The Royal Treatment in Non-Food ways
The Neighborhood
Recipes: Budget Friendly Rotisserie Chicken