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Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Getting Party Ready with Your WLS Tool

I wrote this article for the 5 Day Pouch Test Bulletin published 12/06/2010. For anyone with weight loss surgery who is preparing for a holiday party the advice is timely. I think it defines so well what many of us say our new objective is after weight loss surgery --- to enjoy LIVING!

Not so good conventional advice...

Eat a small meal before the party
I'm sure you are familiar with this holiday tip - eat a small meal before the party so you do not overeat at the party. Since all of our WLS meals are small this is ineffective for us - it just means we double-up on small meals that day. What works better is to have an all-protein meal earlier in the day, before the party.

For example, if the party is at 7pm have an all-protein lunch of grilled chicken breast at 4pm; about 3 ounces of broiled boneless chicken breast gives you 110 calories (energy) and 25 grams of protein with only 2 grams of fat. This is important because it temporarily raises your metabolism by making your body work harder to digest the food. Protein also satiates appetite for a longer time than carbohydrates. In addition, with protein you have not caused a drop or spike to your blood glucose levels which for many triggers snacky carbohydrate cravings. On a more delicate note, clean lean protein is unlikely to cause digestive distress such as uncomfortable bloating or gas - two things we do not want to wear to the party!

Keep in mind as you are preparing for the party that the goal is to arrive at the party in the very best state of biochemical balance possible so you can enjoy the people, the setting, the entertainment, and the total party experience. You can best do this by following the Four Rules and Liquid Restrictions in the days and hours leading up to the party. It is a privilege to attend a party in a state of balance and good health, a privilege worth the effort, a privilege you deserve to enjoy!

After giving your body the delicious protein-only lunch allow it time to digest the nutrients before partaking of liquids. A good hour following eating is beneficial to allow your body adequate time to metabolize the fuel you have just provided it. After digestion hydrate your body with a nutrient enhanced beverage. This could be herbal tea or iced water with a squeeze of fresh citrus juice. Perhaps you prefer an energy booster such as Emergen-C (my favorite). Avoid beverages sweetened with sugar alcohols because they are prone to cause uncomfortable gas and bloating.

OK! You've done great getting your body ready for an evening out celebrating the holidays. But do you realize what else has occurred by doing these simple things? You have created a storm of empowerment where anything is possible! Think about it. Instead of spending the day of the party making poor dietary choices for which you are feeling self-critical, you have done the right thing! You have been true to yourself and your health! Nothing is impossible for you on this day! So go that party and shine like a diamond. Accept the compliments you receive - relish in your new life - Celebrate! This is your moment - You Have Arrived!

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Better Than Green Bean Casserole

A couple of years ago I came across this recipe in Vegetarian Times and served it for Thanksgiving in place of traditional green bean casserole - you know the one with the canned soup and canned fried onions. This dish is so delicious and such a crowd pleaser I have been making it ever since. Here is the recipe direct from Vegetarian Times -- I hope it finds a way to your holiday table this year!

Green Beans with Walnuts and Shallot Crisps

Shallot crisps are the star attraction here and can be made in advance. In a tightly sealed jar, they will keep at room temperature for 2 weeks—but you’d better hide the jar.

 Vegetarian Times Issue: November 1, 2008   p.71   —   Member Rating: 1111

Ingredient List

Serves 8
Shallot Crisps
  • 5 large shallots (½ lb.), peeled and sliced into thin rings
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
Green Beans
  • 2 lb. green beans, trimmed
  • 3 Tbs. apple cider vinegar
  • 3 Tbs. Dijon mustard
  • 3 Tbs. vegetable oil
  • 3 Tbs. maple syrup
  • 1 cup toasted chopped walnuts (½ lb.)

Directions

1. To make Shallot Crisps: Spread shallot rings on paper towel, sprinkle with salt, and cover with another paper towel. Let stand 10 minutes. Blot excess moisture from shallots.
2. Heat oil in small saucepan over medium heat. Add shallots, and fry
2 to 4 minutes, or until golden brown, stirring frequently.
3. Pour shallots and oil through fine mesh strainer, or remove shallots with slotted spoon. Spread shallots on paper towels to drain and cool. Discard oil. Store shallots in jar, if desired.
4. To make Green Beans: Cook beans
in large pot of boiling salted water 5 to 8 minutes, or until just tender. Drain. Whisk together vinegar, mustard, oil, and maple syrup in serving bowl. Add green beans, and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Top with Shallot Crisps and chopped walnuts, and serve.


Nutritional Information

Per : Calories: 253, Protein: 5g, Total fat: 18g, Saturated fat: 1.5g, Carbs: 22g, Cholesterol: mg, Sodium: 291mg, Fiber: 5g, Sugars: 9g

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

2010 Limited Edition Classic Poultry Blend Seasoning - ON Sale Now!

LivingAfterWLS General Store
The low-sodium herb blend is shown here in the decorative tin. The 2-ounce container (1/2 cup volume) is plenty to flavor your favorite autumn roast poultry, pork and vegetables throughout the cold winter months and will stay fresh and flavorful stored in the functional reusable tin. Tin measures 4-1/4"x 2-3/4" x 1-1/4" deep. Spice blend is delivered in tin tightly preserved in resealable plastic bag for optimum freshness.

"Smells like Thanksgiving, and stuffing, and home. Delicious. "
Kaye's husband Jim

Buy Now
Suggested Price: $10.40
Your Value Price: $8.55 - Save $1.85


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Our Thanks to You
Coupon Code: THANKS2010
Save $3.00 Off Order of $20 or More!!
November 15-30, 2010

Holiday Pies: What Every Weight Loss Surgery Patient Should Know


We all know we shouldn't reach for the holiday pie after Weight Loss Surgery (WLS) - it's against the rules and the potential to make us sick is very high. If that's not enough to motivate restraint how about considering the nutrient analysis of some favorite American pies. Take a look and see if it is really worth it to taste that full-fat, full-sugar dessert:

(Based on a 1/8 slice of the pie)
Pumpkin Pie: 461 calories, 21 grams fat, 9 grams protein and 60 grams carbs

Pecan Pie: 436 calories, 17.2 grams fat, 3 grams protein and 67 grams carbs.

Apple, Blueberry or Cherry: 340 Calories, 16 grams fat, 3 grams protein, 46 grams carbs.

Coconut Cream Pie: 485 Calories, 25 grams fat, 6 grams protein, 48 grams carbs.

Chocolate Cream Pie: 401 calories, 21 grams fat, 6 grams protein, 50 grams carbs.

Top that slice o'pie with real whipped cream - add another 104 calories, 11 grams fat, 41 grams cholesterol and a gram each of protein and carbs.

I'm laying down my pie fork right now! It's just not worth a taste of pie to risk being sick, uncomfortable or worse weight gain. (I know - you can't gain weight with one taste of pie - but I have never been able to restrain myself to one taste. What about you?)


Still don't want to go without pie this holiday season? Here are two sugarless and relatively safe dessert recipes for celebrating LivingAfterWLS style. Indulge with caution - though they do not contain sugar they are sweetened with artificial sweetener and contain high amounts of fat, calories and carbs.

Pumpkin Pie
Ingredients:
Pastry for single-crust 9-inch pie
1 can (16 ounces) pumpkin
1 can (12 ounces) evaporated skim milk
3 eggs
5-1/2 teaspoons Equal® for Recipes
 or 18 packets Equal® sweetener
 or 3/4 cup Equal® Spoonful(TM)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

Instructions:
Roll pastry on floured surface into circle 1 inch larger than inverted 9-inch pie pan. Ease into pan; trim and flute edge.

Beat pumpkin, evaporated milk and eggs in medium bowl; beat in remaining ingredients. Pour into pastry shell. Bake in preheated 425°F oven 15 minutes; reduce heat to 350°F and bake until knife inserted near center comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

Nutrition (1/8 slice of pie): 175 calories; 8 grams protein; 22 grams carbs; 7 grams fat


Chocolate Cream Pie
 Ingredients:
Pastry for single-crust 9-inch pie
1/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 to 1/3 cup European or Dutch-process cocoa
10-3/4 teaspoons Equal® for Recipes
or 36 packets Equal® sweetener
or 1-1/2 cups Equal® Spoonful(TM)
1/8 teaspoon salt
3 cups skim milk
2 eggs
2 egg whites
1 teaspoon vanilla
8 tablespoons thawed frozen light whipped topping

Equal® sweetener can be substituted with other sweetener products. Nutrition contents might be different from those listed below.

Directions:
Roll pastry on lightly floured surface into circle 1 inch larger than inverted 9-inch pie pan. Ease pastry into pan; trim and flute edge. Pierce bottom and side of pastry with fork. Bake in preheated 425oF oven until crust is browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

Combine cornstarch, cocoa, Equal® and salt in medium saucepan; stir in milk. Heat to boiling over medium-high heat, whisking constantly. Boil until thickened, about 1 minute.

Beat eggs and egg whites in small bowl; whisk about 1 cup chocolate mixture into eggs. Whisk egg mixture into chocolate mixture in saucepan. Cook over very low heat, whisking constantly, 30 to 60 seconds. Remove from heat; stir in vanilla.

Spread hot filling in baked crust; refrigerate until chilled and set, about 6 hours. Cut into wedges and place on serving plates; garnish each serving with dollop of whipped topping, if desired.

Nutrition (1/8 slice of pie): 188 calories; 7 grams protein; 25 grams carbs; 7 grams fat.


Kaye Bailey © 2005 - All Rights Reserved

Emergency Preparedness For WLS Patients

It looks like many of us in North America are about to face some pretty intense winter weather. In fact, there are numerous winter storm and blizzard warnings posted from the Pacific Northwest clear across the nation to New England. Now is a good time to make sure we are WLS-ready in the event we find ourselves without transportation, heat, and/or power. I'm checking my emergency rations this morning and found this old article to be a useful prompt in reminding me what I need to have on hand. Sometimes we adapt so well to our weight loss surgery needs we forget that we are "special needs" people. So take a look and please be safe and sound as Old Man Winter howls all around!  

Emergency Preparedness For Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Following weight loss surgery patients make a multitude of adjustments in their lives to accommodate the dietary and nutritional needs of an altered gastric digestive system. Even if weight loss has long been accomplished patients who have undergone gastric bypass, gastric banding or gastric sleeve surgical procedures must, for the rest of their life, maintain rigorous nutritional and dietary habits in order to be healthy. After time these adjustments feel like second nature to the patient and even those around them. But in preparing an emergency kit for use in the wake of a natural or national disaster it is essential that weight loss surgery patients treat themselves as "special needs" and ensure their nutritional and dietary needs are provided for in the event the emergency kit is put into service.

Flood, fire, national disaster, or the loss of power from high winds, snow, or ice frequently jeopardize the health and safety of thousands of Americans each year. This year weather events and natural disasters have been particularly harsh throughout the world and many thousands have found themselves without food, shelter or warmth. While we cannot prevent natural or national disasters we can assemble emergency supply kits to improve our survivability when disaster strikes.

A well-prepared basic emergency supply kit will contain items to provide for the basics of survival: fresh water, food, clean air and warmth. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends the following items be included in a basic emergency supply kit:

Water, one gallon of water per person per day for a least three days, for drinking and sanitation
Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
Battery-powered or hand crank radio and NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
Flashlight and extra batteries
First aid kit
Whistle to signal for help
Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
Personal hygiene items
Wrench or pliers to turn off utilitites
Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)
Local maps
Cell phone with chargers

Emergency readiness kits should provide water, food, clean air and warmth for 72 hours. Keeping that in mind a "special needs" weight loss surgery patient should consider including the following items in their personal readiness kit:

Vitamins and supplements for three days. Additional dosages of vitamins B and C may be included to relieve stress and boost immunity.
Non-NSAID over-the-counter pain relief medicine. Most surgical weight loss patients are discouraged from using NSAID medication for pain relief. Make sure acceptable OTC pain relief is included in the First aid kit.
Vitamin fortified or protein fortified powder drink mixes in individual packages. These are useful in adding minerals and nutrients to the diet while stretching the water supply because when mixed with the water rations they provide hydration and vitamin and mineral nutrition.

Ready-to-Drink (RTD) and Ready-to-Eat (RTE) protein drinks and protein bars. A weight loss surgery patient must have a minimum of 60 grams protein per day for best health. Provide at least 60 grams of dietary protein per day for three days of emergency use.
Sugar free hard candy to supplement food intake and keep the mouth moist.
Additional bedding or clothing for warmth. Body temperature regulation is difficult for those having lost body weight or body mass. Provide extra items for warmth in the event of a disaster that subjects the weight loss surgery patient to extreme cold or elements.

Emergency response information for the treatment of a bariatric patient including contact numbers. Make this information readily available to first responders.Gather items for the emergency preparedness kit in one location. Stow the items in a portable duffel bag or plastic bin that is accessible and labeled for easy access in the event of an emergency. Ideally each household member will have a kit tailored for their needs. Periodically check the kit and replenish items that have expired. Make certain all contact information is current. It is not easy to think about facing a disaster, but should the day come when the emergency kit is needed a little preparation will go a long way in making a bad situation better.

Article Source: Emergency Preparedness For Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Thursday, November 04, 2010

You Have Arrived Seasonings - Holiday Blends!

NEW!
Limited Edition ---
2010 Seasoning Blend Collection
in Decorative Keepsake Tins
Three Blends:


  • Classic Poultry

  • Sweet Life Spice

  • Mulling Spice

  • You loved our 2009 Limited Edition Blend - Once again we are pleased to introduce a collection of three limited edition seasonal blends to support your healthy weight loss surgery Living.
    Enhance your holiday cooking & share with a friend. Great Gift Idea!

    Seasonal Blend Gift Set
    2010 Seasoning Blend Gift Set includes 2-ounces each: Sweet Life Spice, Classic Poultry Blend and Mulling Spice. The tins are nested in quality tissue accented with decorative cinnamon sticks tied with all natural raffia. Each tin measures 4-1/4"x 2-3/4" x 1-1/4" deep. Shown below:
    Gift Set
    Our beautiful Gift Set is the best value, priced to save you 20% off the suggested retail price. Season your Holidays with this quality set of spices!
    You will enjoy the high quality goodness of the You Have Arrived seasoning blends knowing you are partaking of all natural ingredients, no MSG, phosphates or fillers. After everything you have done to become a healthier you don't you deserve the best? Treat yourself and a friend too. A gift that will be enjoyed through the season! Read descriptions below for each seasoning blend.
    Buy Now
    Suggested Price: $30.70
    Your Value Price: $24.60 -- Save 20%
    Free recipe flyer with each gift set.

    BUY NOW - Limited Supply

    Wednesday, November 03, 2010

    The Feasting Season - How to Cope

    Little Reminders that Make a BIG Difference
    Fasten Your WLS Safety Belt

    Autumn LeafhintsEven if you are not planning to do the 5 Day Pouch Test this week or any time soon there are things we can learn from it that help keep us on track, particularly during the feasting season. Think of it this way: When you get in your automobile to drive someplace a little reminder light illuminates on the dashboard to remind you to fasten your seat belt. Now, you do not say to the car, "Today I do not plan to get in an accident so it is not necessary for me to wear the safety belt." No. What you do is put on the seat belt and make certain it is latched securely. You protect your safety even though you have no intention of being in an accident. By the same token we can take safety precautions to protect our WLS health even though we have no intention of coming in harms way. Think of the following actions as buckling your WLS safety belt, keeping you securely in place in the event of an accident:

    Daily Vitamin Supplements: It is proven that our immunity weakens this time of year due to weather and stress. Protect your immunity by following the vitamin supplementation program prescribed by your bariatric center, nutritionist or general practitioner. Make this a priority. This is not selfish. In order for you to be healthy enough to take care of the commitments and obligations in your life you must first take care of your nutritional health. Take your vitamins. Consult your doctor if you are uncertain about what vitamins and minerals you should be supplementing in your diet.
    Neighborhood Conversations: Diet, Nutrition, Supplements

    Splurge Wisely: I don't think it is fair or reasonable to expect that once we have weight loss surgery we will never enjoy a food splurge again. But what I do know is that as I gain WLS maturity I learn to splurge more wisely when opportunity presents itself. For example, I am a recovering macaroni salad lover. In fact I dare say a goodly portion of my former thunder thighs may very well have been macaroni salad incarnated! But the fact is, macaroni salad is not that good. Macaroni salad is truly not splurge-worthy. These days I am happy to overlook the macaroni salad in favor of a finer culinary experience such as baked brie and poached pears or a vine ripened strawberry dipped in dark chocolate. Put a value on your splurge and you can be certain to enjoy it all that much more.
    Looking for Splurge-Worthy Recipe? Try Cheesecake Dainties

    Beware: Nobody Can Eat Just One Chip! A popular potato chip slogan claims "nobody can eat just one" and it is one of the greatest truths in advertising. Soft salty carbohydrate snacks are addictive and lead to weight gain before bariatric surgery and sadly, many have gained weight after bariatric surgery from eating soft salty processed carbohydrates like potato chips. After surgery soft carbs are considered slider food because they move quickly through the small surgical pouch and satiation never occurs when eating them. In addition, the saltiness prompts us to drink liquid with them further creating slurry and washing them through to be absorbed and converted for fat storage by the body. Often we eat slider foods in unchecked portion size and the very nature of the surgical pouch is defeated. While it may seem extreme please consider complete abstinence from salty soft carb snacks rather than having just a few and then mustering the will-power to stop eating. Nobody has ever told me they felt bad after a party at which they ignored the chip bowl, but hundreds of people have confided how low they felt when they could not keep their hands out of the chips. You already know what chips taste like. Nothing there to see. Move along.
    Must Read: Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain
     
    Kindness Counts. In an age of anger and discord small acts of kindness go a long way in making the world a brighter place. Speaking in generalities people recovering from morbid obesity tend to be generous and compassionate to others. I  often witness you serving commiseration from a seemingly bottomless pot of kindness. Today I suggest you serve yourself first and enjoy the pleasure of your own kindness. You are a good and worthy person deserving of your own generosity. Enjoy it. Take a break from the self-judgment that seems to prevail and celebrate the good and valued person that you are. Be kind to yourself today.


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    Wednesday, October 06, 2010

    The Down & Dirty on Dumping

    Today's article section links to several important and helpful articles about dumping syndrome. Take a look and see how you fit in a generalized picture of this phenomena that many of us consider both a blessing and a curse. Remember there is power in knowledge and we are all in this together!

    Gastric Bypass Dumping Syndrome - Three Foods that Cause It
    As pre-op weight loss surgery patients we are taught to fear the mysterious dumping syndrome and in most cases we are told that avoiding sugar will prevent the occurrence of dumping syndrome. So it comes as a surprise when after having a malabsorptive gastric surgery we experience symptoms that we think are dumping syndrome, yet sugar has not crossed our lips. In this article we take a look at dumping syndrome so that we can understand the full picture - beyond the sugar - and avoid the foods that may cause it. Full Article

    Emergency First Aid For Gastric Bypass Dumping Syndrome
    For patients of gastric bypass surgery an episode of dumping syndrome or rapid gastric emptying is physically dramatic and lifestyle disruptive. Prior to surgery patients are instructed to avoid sweet processed carbohydrates, greasy fried food and all simple carbs in order to avoid dumping syndrome. Inevitably, patients will at some point experience the symptoms of dumping after eating food that is too quickly absorbed in the small intestine. Learn what to do in the event of a gastric dumping episode. Full Article

    Considering Weight Loss Surgery? Learn About Dumping Syndrome First
    Morbidly obese people considering bariatric surgery typically have three surgical procedures to consider when discussing weight loss surgery with their doctor: gastric bypass, gastric banding and gastric sleeve. Dumping syndrome, an unpleasant physical reaction associated with malabsorptive gastric surgery, is one risk to be aware of when considering weight loss surgery. Full Article

    Do Not Let Dumping Syndrome Ruin Your Summer Celebration
    Summer is a time to celebrate warm weather, sunshine, good friends and good times - often with food and drink. But for people with weight loss surgery celebrations bring the potential for a dietary crisis called dumping syndrome that has the potential to ruin a day of good old fashioned summer time fun. Read More

    Article Directory at 5 Day Pouch Test

    Monday, October 04, 2010

    Healthy Vigilance Benefits Women Fighting Obesity With Weight Loss Surgery

    For many women, weight loss surgery is a springboard for improved vigilance regarding all personal health issues. Women in particular become champions of their own health following the massive weight loss that results from gastric bypass, adjustable gastric band (lap-band), or gastric sleeve surgery. The weight loss affords many who suffered from overall poor health due to morbid obesity a chance to actively pursue a healthier lifestyle, including proactive monitoring of health risks.

    Patients are advised to develop a relationship with their general health care provider who will monitor health risks with standard testing. Below are guidelines for standard testing. However, some patients may require different tests or different frequency in testing based on their health and family history of disease.

    Breast Cancer: Mammogram is the standard screening test for breast cancer. Unless there is a family history of breast cancer women should be screened beginning at age 40 with follow-up screening every 1 to 2 years on the advice of their physician.

    Cervical Cancer: Women age 25 or older should have a pap smear every 1 to 3 years to screen for cervical cancer. Personal health and family history will factor in your doctors decision for the frequency of testing. Screening may stop at age 65 if advised by a physician.

    Colorectal Cancer: Women should be tested for colorectal cancer beginning at age 50 with a colonoscopy. The test should be repeated every 5 to 10 years.

    Diabetes: The FPG test; oral glucose tolerance test, is the standard method of screening for diabetes. With no risk factors or family history of diabetes testing for women will begin at age 45 and be repeated every 3 years.

    High Blood Pressure: The familiar blood press cuff (Sphygmomanometer) is the standard test for high blood pressure. Women should be tested beginning at age 30 with monitoring every 2 years, or more frequently if blood pressure tests high.

    High Cholesterol: A blood test to measure the lipoprotein profile will indicate when a woman has high cholesterol. Cholesterol levels should be measured beginning at age 20 and repeated every 5 years. More frequent testing may be prescribed for those found to have high cholesterol.
     
    Osteoporosis:
    A bone density test will be done to determine the health of the skeletal system. Women should be tested for osteoporosis beginning at age 65 and repeated every two years. Earlier testing may be ordered for those with a family history of osteoporosis.

    Standard guidelines are set for all medical testing. However, a close relationship with your personal physician may indicate a different screening schedule for you based on your personal health history, current symptoms, and family health history. Establishing an honest and mindful relationship with a health care provider is beneficial to all seeking proactive health management.

    LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood
    5DayPouchTest

    Saturday, October 02, 2010

    You Have Arrived Dreamy Pumpkin Pie - FREE Recipe & Seasoning Sample

    LivingAfterWLS and Kaye Bailey are pleased you have chosen to make us part of your long-term success with weight loss surgery. We are committed to supporting you with quality products to enhance your life and empower your success
     
    The LivingAfterWLS General Store - Coupon Sale!


    CELEBRATE The Sweet Life!!!
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    Free recipe:
    You Have Arrived Dreamy Pumpkin Pie

    Dreamy Pumpkin Pie
    Recipe includes FREE seasoning sample to make this delicious pie! Plus additional serving ideas.
    A delicious WLS-Friendly addition to your autumn menu.
    ($1.95 Value! -- Free with order!)
    Offer Expires October 8, 2010
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    Weight Gain is Not a Moral Issue

    Lately the bulk of the email I have received is about weight regain: from people who have put on weight after losing it with surgery and people who are afraid they will gain weight after working so hard to lose it. As I think about it I have never met a WLS patient who is not concerned about the weight coming back. When you think about it, it makes sense. By the time we are morbidly obese we have probably lost and gained the same pounds many times over. We live in a world where being overweight and staying overweight is easy -- Losing weight is the opposite. Losing weight and keeping it off is akin to swimming upstream in a swift current.

    There are a few things I hope you will remember about weight regain which may help you face it rationally with kind and gentle compassion:

    Weight regain is not a moral issue. A person is not good if they lose weight and bad if they gain weight. Gained weight is a symptom of the metabolic disorder called obesity. When weight is lost and managed the disease is in remission; when weight gain occurs the disease is in relapse. Managing the disease is our responsibility and we are served well when seeking the support of others including our bariatric team, friends, family and WLS community. (Read: Four Truths About Weight Gain After WLS)

    Knowledge is power. Not long ago I heard a bariatric surgeon say that patients regain weight because they were not fully educated before surgery. The fact is, life after surgery is quite overwhelming. I'm positive I retained only scant bits of information taught during my pre-op and early post-op recovery. What I know now is the pursuit of new information day in and day out is mandatory if I'm going to stay focused and enthused about weight management. The best place to learn about life after WLS is from other patients who are doing their best -- just like you -- to make this weight management experience healthy and effective.

    It is never too late. If we have allowed our health problem to become a moral problem it is easy to suffer feelings of hopelessness. But it is never too late to make little changes which bring about a big difference in our life. Each new day, each new meal, each new step we take is an opportunity to nurture our body and being. It is never too late.

    Today's LivingAfterWLS Digest will point you to several resources addressing the topic of weight regain after surgery. Take a moment to find something meaningful to you, and pass the word on to a friend who may be feeling down and discouraged. Remember, we are all in this together!


    LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood

    CHEERS - You Can Do This!
    Kaye

    Weight Management with Weight Loss Surgery

    Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery
    Before undergoing bariatric surgery for weight loss it is hard to imagine that we could possibly ever become one of "those people" who gain weight after losing it with the help of surgery. Sadly, at some point most patients who have gastric surgery as their last hope for weight loss eventually regain some weight back. It can happen quickly and without fanfare. Link here to learn about three red flags to watch for that may lead to weight regain.

    Capture regain with 5 Day Pouch Test

    Understanding the Liquid Restrictions of WLS
    Liquid restrictions are imposed on patients of all bariatric procedures including gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding (lap-band) and gastric sleeve. For thirty minutes prior to eating and thirty minutes following eating patients are to abstain from drinking fluids. They must not partake of liquids while eating. Learn why liquid restrictions play a key role in weight loss for bariatric patients. Read Full Article

    Restrict Liquids, Drink Lots of Water - HUH?
    Making Sense of WLS Guidelines
    In a country where food and drink go hand in hand weight loss surgery patients are challenged to follow the liquid restrictions as instructed by their bariatric center. But understanding and following the liquid restrictions plays a key role in long-term weight maintenance following gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, or adjustable gastric banding (lap-band) surgeries. Learn more

    Friday, October 01, 2010

    Restrict Liquids, Drink Lots of Water - HUH?

    Making Sense of Weight Loss Surgery Guidelines

    In a country where food and drink go hand in hand weight loss surgery patients are challenged to follow the liquid restrictions as instructed by their bariatric center. But understanding and following the liquid restrictions plays a key role in long-term weight maintenance following gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, or adjustable gastric banding (lap-band) surgeries.

    In general, bariatric centers instruct weight loss surgery patients to avoid drinking liquids for thirty minutes before a meal, during the meal, and for thirty minutes following the meal. This easily adds up to 90 minutes of no liquids three times a day: four-and-one-half waking hours. It is easy for patients to become frustrated with these restrictions because another rule of weight loss surgery is to drink lots of water, at least 64 ounces a day. Understanding why the liquid restrictions are necessary and how water intake affects weight management will increase the likelihood a patient will follow the guidelines.

    When a person undergoes any of the currently practiced bariatric and metabolic surgeries for weight loss the size of the stomach is reduced significantly to restrict the amount of food which may be eaten at a given time. The size of the restricted pouch varies by procedure, surgeon and patient. What is consistent, however, is that the smaller stomach pouch fills quickly and the patient experiences a feeling of fullness and satiation, which must be sustained following the meal to avoid hunger and cravings later. This is to keep the patient from over eating. In addition, the longer food is kept in the digestive system the more opportunity the body has to absorb and metabolize nutrients. The best way to sustain this fullness is to eat lean protein and low-glycemic complex carbohydrates in a ratio of two bites protein to one bite carbohydrate.

    For many weight loss surgery patients the feeling of tightness or restriction that results following eating is unfamiliar and uncomfortable. In weight loss surgery street talk these patients learn to "eat around the pouch". In many cases that means drinking liquid with solid food which relieves the tightness as the chewed food (chyme: semi-liquid mass of partly digested food) mixes with liquids to form a more fluid liquid slurry which passes through the new stomach outlet more rapidly. The result is increased food intake because patients can eat more food during a planned meal and they are likely to eat again later because they are hungry and the slurry meal failed to satiate hunger for a reasonable amount of time.

    Learn More: Understanding the Liquid Restrictions of WLS

    As important as it is to follow the liquid restrictions it is equally important to drink adequate water. The body is made up of about 60 percent water. Water assists with the transport of nutrients and waste products throughout the body. Water is present in every process of human biology. Most centers recommend a minimum intake of 64 ounces a day. Others suggest morbidly obese patients drink one ounce of water for every two pounds of body weight.

    Organized planning is helpful when following liquid restrictions and drinking lots of water. Begin the day with water and enjoy water between meals, which will also help keep cravings away. Keeping a glass or bottle of water at arms reach is a steady reminder to sip often and stay hydrated. Newly post-operative patients report drinking tepid or room temperature water is easier on the pouch thus making it possible to drink more.

    Kaye Bailey (c) All Rights Reserved

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    Monday, September 27, 2010

    Let's Get the 5 Day Pouch Test Done Right!

    Kaye shares secrets to getting the 5 Day Pouch Test right and keeping the momentum going beyond Day 5. Learn how to use an important tool that will empower your success. You Can Do This!

    Saturday, September 25, 2010

    Weekend Coupon: Save $2 & Receive FREE Gift


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    If Broccoli Is So Good for Me, Why Does It Make Me Sick After WLS?

    By Kaye Bailey

    People in pursuit of healthy weight management know to stick close to the veggie tray at parties and buffets. After all, vegetables are good healthy food full of beneficial vitamins, nutrients and fiber. But some vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables like the ubiquitous broccoli and cauliflower, can cause severe gastric upset when eaten raw by patients of gastric weight loss surgery. In fact, there are many examples of weight loss surgery patients who have experienced gastric distress so severe after eating raw broccoli or cauliflower that a trip to the emergency room was needed.

    The reason weight loss surgery patients of all procedures (gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, adjustable gastric banding or lap-band) are prone to discomfort after eating raw cruciferous vegetables is a matter of balance. The vegetables are rich in enzymes which are believed to aid digestion. However, due to the shortened gastric tract and loss of stomach acid the vegetables cannot be fully digested in their short trip through the intestinal tract. The problem is compounded by the presence of cellulose, the dietary fiber in the vegetables that requires intestinal bacteria to process. Even without gastric weight loss surgery many humans lack enough intestinal bacteria to break down the cellulose enough to avoid symptoms of gas, bloating, and cramping.

    After weight loss surgery many patients are intently focused on becoming healthy and in control of their weight through proper diet and nutrition and increased daily activity. These are admirable pursuits which often lead to the conundrum over eating good healthy vegetables at the risk of severe gastric distress. Frustrated patients wonder, If it is so good for me why does it make me feel so bad? Good question. There are a few measures that may be taken to reduce the discomfort that follows eating raw vegetables so we can have our nutrients and enjoy them too. Take a look:

    Experiment cautiously. If you do not know how you will respond to raw vegetables go easy at first and avoid discomfort or embarrassment that may come from eating too much of a good thing. In addition, remember that from day to day foods will sit differently. Always practice restraint while you get a feel for how food is setting with you that day.

    Lightly steam or parboil vegetables to begin breaking-down the cellular structure thus helping the intestinal acid get busy more quickly with digestion. Remember, if you cannot digest the vegetable you will not be able to absorb the vitamins and nutrients in the vegetable. To serve the steamed or parboiled vegetables chilled simply prepare them in advance, drain of water and pat dry. Plate, cover and chill. Then serve cold with a lightly seasoned veggie dip made from yogurt which contains healthy bacteria that will aid in digestion. Avoid dairy-based dips, such as those made with sour cream, as this may increase the chance of stomach discomfort.

    Take a digestive enzyme as directed prior to or shortly after eating raw vegetables. There are many digestive enzyme supplements available at reasonable cost. Many weight loss surgery patients report that papaya enzyme is effective in reducing digestive discomfort. According to one maker of papaya enzyme the dietary supplement contains "papain, a proteolytic enzyme and a popular ingredient in dietary supplements used for digestion. Taken after meals, it is a perfect natural supplement that may assist in digestion and may help reduce the effects of poor digestion, including heartburn and gas." As with all dietary supplements keep in mind the FDA does not evaluate these claims or approve supplements for their claimed use. Consumers should consult with a health care professional before using any dietary supplement.

    Chew, chew, chew. Remember that digestion begins in the mouth and it is critical to chew completely all raw vegetables in order to give your gastric system the best conditions under which to digest food and benefit from the vitamins and nutrients it contains.

    Kaye Bailey (c) - All Rights Reserved

    For more terrific weight loss surgery friendly recipes and information link to [http://www.livingafterwls.com/Recipes.html]LivingAfterWLS Kitchen


    Join the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood: Your safe haven circle of friends making the most of their weight loss surgery experience. [http://livingafterwls.com/forum/index.php?act=idx]LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood

    Article Source: [http://EzineArticles.com/?If-Broccoli-Is-So-Good-for-Me,-Why-Does-It-Make-Me-Sick-After-Weight-Loss-Surgery?&id=5090408] If Broccoli Is So Good for Me, Why Does It Make Me Sick After Weight Loss Surgery?

    Friday, September 24, 2010

    Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery



    By Kaye Bailey

    Before undergoing bariatric surgery for weight loss it is hard to imagine that we could possibly ever become one of "those people" who gain weight after losing it with the help of surgery. Sadly, at some point most patients who have gastric surgery as their last hope for weight loss eventually regain some weight back. It can happen quickly and without fanfare. Here are three red flags to watch for that may lead to weight regain:

    Snacking on Soft Carbs. Over the last 10 years countless bariatric patients have told me, "It seemed harmless at first to eat a few pretzels (crackers, chips, cookies, etc.) but pretty soon I was eating them all day and the weight started coming back." This is a common mistake made by weight loss surgery patients that eventually leads to regaining some weight previously lost with weight loss surgery. We turn to soft carbohydrates because, in most cases, they are comfortable in the stomach pouch, they taste good, and they are readily available. Unfortunately, soft carbohydrates defeat the function of the stomach pouch. When we eat a meal of lean protein and vegetable carbohydrates the food stays in our stomach pouch and we feel a sense of fullness or tightness that signals us to stop eating. Soft carbohydrates on the other hand pass quickly through the pouch and the sensation of fullness is not achieved, therefore we can eat soft carbohydrates seemingly all day. The first rule of weight loss surgery is "Protein First" and rule number three is "No Snacking." Remembering these rules will help us refrain from snacking on soft processed carbs, a habit that may lead to weight gain for bariatric patients.

    Drinking Liquid with Meals. Generally speaking bariatric patients are instructed to cease consumption of liquids 30 minutes before and 30 minutes after eating. In addition they are told to refrain from drinking beverages with meals. The liquid restrictions are intended to keep mealtime focus on a high protein diet of lean animal, dairy and vegetable protein. The high protein food fills the gastric pouch and sustains satiation best when liquid is absent. When we consume beverages with our lean protein meal the food is washed through the gastric pouch before fully digested. Nutrients are lost as food is washed away and hunger returns more quickly. As we advance following weight loss surgery we tend to relax the liquid restrictions because it is not comfortable to eat food without liquid and dinner conversation is difficult with a dry mouth. An occasional small sip of water with meals may be acceptable and is unlikely to cause weight gain. However the return to full drinking with meals almost always leads to a weight loss plateau or eventually weight gain.

    Avoiding the Scale. During the early weeks and months following weight loss surgery patients find themselves weighing frequently because it is exciting to measure our weight loss on the bathroom scale. In fact, for some patients in the phase of weight loss the relationship with the scale becomes a near-obsession. Sadly as life-long dieters bariatric patients intuitively know when the pendulum has swung from losing weight to gaining weight. Avoiding the bathroom scale is a loud red flag warning that weight gain is imminent. This is understandable, we have worked hard for weight loss and avoiding the scale allows us to deny or ignore what we already know: we are gaining weight. Patients who establish a weekly ritual of weighing on the same day of each week at the same time and place tend to be more accountable for weight gain and more likely to correct behaviors leading to weight gain at an early stage. Patients who find them self avoiding the scale are encouraged to engage in self-assessment to identify the cause of weight gain and correct behaviors quickly.

    Before weight loss surgery we are told that gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding (lap-band), or gastric sleeve procedures are only a tool for weight loss. We are instructed to adopt a lifestyle that includes dietary and physical activity modifications. This new lifestyle is to be followed for the rest of our life in order to maintain weight loss and achieve improved health. As much as the surgery is a tool, so are we human prone to the ups and downs we call life. Red flags are also tools -warning tools- that when observed give us opportunity to make a correction and move forward in a favorable direction.

    Kaye Bailey (c) 2010 - All Rights Reserved
    LivingAfterWLS
    5DayPouchTest

    Article Source: Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery

    Tuesday, September 14, 2010

    The 5 Day Pouch Test Bargain Bundle

    Are you ready to get back on track with your weight loss surgery? Give the 5 Day Pouch Test a try and do it right with the 5 Day Pouch Test Bargain Bundle. Everything you need to succeed and get back to the basics of your weight loss surgery.


    This bargain price bundle includes the 5 Day Pouch Test Owner's Manual by Kaye Bailey, Feed the Carb Monster Soup Mixes, Emergency Bundle and Free Goody Bag! Put together and shipped USPS Priority Mail so you can get back on track right away!
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    More Great Products: LivingAfterWLS General Store

    Four Truths About Weight Regain After Weight Loss Surgery

    I was born with the disease obesity and by the time I was out of college it had advanced to morbid obesity. At age 33 my disease was treated with gastric bypass surgery which affected a loss of weight that put my disease, morbid obesity, in remission. Three years later I suffered a relapse of my disease with a weight gain of 20 pounds. Through dietary and lifestyle compliance, much like a person with heart disease who suffers a relapse, I was able to put my disease, obesity, back in remission. I will always have the disease of morbid obesity and am fortunate that I was able, at a young age, to be treated with the best medically available option.

    The Facts:
    • Obesity is a disease.
    • Weight loss puts the disease in remission.
    • Weight gain puts the disease in relapse.
    • Like most diseases, victims of obesity are responsible to make dietary and lifestyle changes that work with medical treatment to keep our disease in remission.
    • Like most diseases, relapses occur, obesity manifests relapse in weight gain.
    • We are not the disease, we have the disease.


    My Four Truths:
    Regain Is Likely: It is generally believed that 80% of people who undergo weight loss surgery (WLS) will experience weight gain (relapse) of 10-30 pounds depending upon initial weight loss. It is further believed that 20% of those will relapse to their former weight and possibly gain more as the disease of morbid obesity advances. This relapse can be the result of failed gastric surgery (the surgery was improperly performed or medical device failure); a non-compliant patient who does not evolve their eating and exercise habits; the active intestine becoming more efficient at absorbing calories; and potential stomach pouch stretch. Dr. Anita Courcoulas, chief of minimally invasive bariatric and general surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center said, "Regaining weight down the road is a common phenomenon for weight loss patients. These patients need to be educated and prepared for it if it happens."

    100% Conviction: It is my experience that 100% of patients who take to the operating table for the treatment of their disease say, "I'm not going to be one of those people  who gain weight after surgery." You can bet the farm I said that - and imagine my embarrassment and shame when I did in fact become one of those people. At the time I didn't understand my disease had relapsed, in part because I had relaxed my newly evolved eating and exercise habits, but also because my body has a disease that wants to store excess fat. I thought I gained weight because I was a failure at surgery.

    I failed AGAIN! I am not alone in my feelings of failure over weight regain. Dr. Courcoulas said, "These are people who feel that they have failed at everything they tried in their lives. If they feel that they are failing surgery, they're embarrassed and they don't want to come back for help." How sad for us. When a cancer patient suffers a relapse do they take it as a personal failure? I sure hope not. Popular media perpetuates the belief that weight gain equals failure. WLS celebrities are splashed across mainstream media and tabloids alike for weight regain. But the celebrity with cancer who suffers relapse? Charity benefits are hosted bearing their name and their bravery is lauded. With a relapse in obesity the celebrity becomes the brunt of jokes for late night comedians. No wonder we don't want to become one of those people but statistics are not on our side

    I Am Not Obese. Since kindergarten the word "fat" defined me and I actually thought that was who I was because "You are fat" and "I am fat" were constant phrases in my world. By about age 40 I finally figured out that I am not fat. I have obesity, a disease. Have you heard a heart attack patient say, "I am heart disease" or a leukemia patient say, "I am cancer"? We are not the disease! We have a disease that is part of the whole person that makes us the wonderfully unique and powerful person we are.
    Relapse to Remission: Just like other diseases, obesity relapse can be put into remission. There is hope! As noted above there are (at least) four reasons for relapse including: failed gastric surgery; a non-compliant patient who does not evolve their eating and exercise habits; the active intestine becoming more efficient at absorbing calories; and potential stomach pouch stretch. Keeping in mind that statistically weight regain is likely, that you are not a failure, and that you are not the disease, you can pragmatically go about mapping a plan to fight your relapse.

    • Seek medical help and treatment: you are fighting a killer disease
    • Assess your eating and exercise evolution and return to the lifestyle prescribed at the time of surgery
    • Educate yourself on nutrition, physical and spiritual health so they may work in harmony to heal your body
    • Seek support, family, friends, community, and fellow patients to help maintain your personal motivation
    • Educate others to stop the ignorance and blame and promote the understanding of this illness we are fighting.


    LivingAfterWLS
    5 Day Pouch Test

    Article Source:  Four Truths About Weight Regain After Weight Loss Surgery

    Tuesday, September 07, 2010

    Monday, August 23, 2010

    Feta Chicken Salad

    Refreshing Summer Fare For Healthy Diets

    Cooked chicken tossed with fresh vegetables and dressing topped with pungent feta cheese and served over mixed salad greens is an excellent way to enjoy a healthy high protein meal full of flavor and nutrients. Use left-over roast chicken from a previous meal or take advantage of deli rotisserie chicken being careful to remove all skin and bones.

    Look for fresh feta cheese in the chilled deli section of most supermarkets. Originating from Greece feta was made by peasants on the lower Balkan peninsula from sheep or goats milk. Feta is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months. It is a crumbly cheese and has a slightly grainy texture. Once removed from the brine it dries out rapidly. For many feta is an acquired taste and the aroma of it has been likened to the smell of bad feet.

    It has only been since about 2002 that feta cheese became commonly available in the United States. It is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads, pastries and baking. The classic Greek dish, spanakopita, is a phyllo-crusted spinach pie that features feta cheese combined with olive oil and vegetables and baked. The rich flavor and saltiness of feta helps make a little bit of cheese go a long way.

    Nutritionally, feta is a good source of protein, riboflavin, vitamin B12, calcium and phosphorus. A wedge-size serving (1.3 ounces) provides 100 calories, 5 grams protein, 8 grams fat and 424mg of sodium. Feta is high in cholesterol and sodium and very high in saturated fat. It may be included as part of a healthy diet when used in moderation.

    Feta Chicken Salad Traditional chicken salad pumped-up with the flavor of feta cheese. This is satisfyingly delicious made with freshly cooked chicken, store-bought rotisserie chicken or canned chicken. Enjoy on a bed of lettuce.

    3 cups diced cooked chicken
    2 large stalks celery, diced
    1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced
    1/2 red onion, diced
    6 tablespoons mayonnaise
    6 tablespoons sour cream
    1 (4 ounce) package feta cheese, crumbled
    2 teaspoons dried dill weed
    1 pinch salt and pepper to taste
    6 cups mixed salad greens

    In a serving bowl, mix together the chicken, celery, and red onion. In a separate bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, sour cream, feta cheese, and dill. Pour over the chicken mixture, and stir to blend. Taste, and season with salt and pepper as needed. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until serving. Serve over crispy chilled mixed salad greens.

    Kaye Bailey (c) - All Rights Reserved

    For more terrific weight loss surgery friendly recipes link to LivingAfterWLS Kitchen

    Join the LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood: Your safe haven circle of friends making the most of their weight loss surgery experience. LivingAfterWLS Neighborhood

    Tuesday, August 10, 2010

    Magnesium Deficiency & WLS Patients

    One nutrient we often overlook is magnesium. A magnesium deficiency can cause personality change manifest by confusion, apprehensiveness and depression. In the old days they put people in mental institutions because they were so nutty from the deficiency. Acute sensitivity to sound is another indication of deficiency -- read to learn more.

    Magnesium Deficiency Causes Personality Change and WLS Patients are at Risk
    By Kaye Bailey

    Have you ever felt like you were completely losing your mind? Like the world was swallowing you up and little things were out of your control and unmanageable? Like you were confused, tired, out of sorts and simply wanted to collapse? Has everyday noise become intolerably loud in your head?

    That's how I was feeling a few months ago. I was confident I'd lost my mind and suffered a serious change of personality (for the worse, I may add).

    My husband noticed my personality change too. He's a good and wise man and quietly did some research. This is what we learned and how we set about correcting my "problem."

    As we know the gastric-bypass patient is at risk for vitamin and mineral deficiency. I religiously take my supplements.  However, I was not taking the RDI of Magnesium which is 400 milligrams/day. Magnesium rich foods are raw rice bran, raw wheat germ, yellow cornmeal, corn, soybeans, soy milk, tofu, raw seeds and nuts, leafy greens, yellow vegetables and fruits, whole cereal grains, milk products & seafood. Meat and poultry are not particularly good sources of magnesium.  Clearly, a weight loss surgery patient will not meet their magnesium requirements through diet.

    From Dr. Bernard Jensen's Guide to Body Chemistry & Nutrition" I quote:

     "I want to point out here that the classical deficiency symptoms for magnesium include neuromuscular signs, such as tremors, weakness, muscle spasms and irregular heartbeat; gastrointestinal signs such as nausea and vomiting; and personality changes that display confusion, apprehensiveness and depression. In the "old days" people with magnesium deficiency were often (mistakenly) taken to mental institutions because they acted so radically different that they literally seemed to be mentally ill."

    In other reading we learned magnesium deficiency leads to a hyper-sensitivity to sound:

     "It is well established that nutritional effects may result in hypersensitive hearing. Many individuals who are deficient in magnesium suffer from sound sensitivity, and they often experience an improvement after receiving magnesium supplements. A suggested 20 milligrams per each 10 pounds of body weight per day, is an appropriate amount of magnesium. Improvement would occur within a few days if the cause of the sensitivity is a magnesium deficiency." This statement appeared in The Sound Connection, 1998, Vol. 5, No. 3.

    I started immediately taking a magnesium supplement  and within a few weeks I felt like a new woman back to my old self again. The hyper-sensitivity to sound diminished and life did not seem so overwhelming. Case in point - exactly two weeks after beginning the magnesium supplement my stepsons and their children arrived unexpectedly at our home for dinner. To make matters worse, we had the kitchen disassembled for a minor remodel project.  I happily adapted and cooked dinner for 7 without having a breakdown. That's when I knew the magnesium was working.

    Patients should talk with their bariatric center if they experience these conditions or concerns. Annual blood tests will indicate if a patient is deficient in magnesium and other essential vitamins and minerals.

    © 2005 Kaye Bailey - All Rights Reserved

    Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery

    By Kaye Bailey

    Before undergoing bariatric surgery for weight loss it is hard to imagine that we could possibly ever become one of "those people" who gain weight after losing it with the help of surgery. Sadly, at some point most patients who have gastric surgery as their last hope for weight loss eventually regain some weight back. It can happen quickly and without fanfare. Here are three red flags to watch for that may lead to weight regain:

    Snacking on Soft Carbs
    . Over the last 10 years countless bariatric patients have told me, "It seemed harmless at first to eat a few pretzels (crackers, chips, cookies, etc.) but pretty soon I was eating them all day and the weight started coming back." This is a common mistake made by weight loss surgery patients that eventually leads to regaining some weight previously lost with weight loss surgery. We turn to soft carbohydrates because, in most cases, they are comfortable in the stomach pouch, they taste good, and they are readily available. Unfortunately, soft carbohydrates defeat the function of the stomach pouch. When we eat a meal of lean protein and vegetable carbohydrates the food stays in our stomach pouch and we feel a sense of fullness or tightness that signals us to stop eating. Soft carbohydrates on the other hand pass quickly through the pouch and the sensation of fullness is not achieved, therefore we can eat soft carbohydrates seemingly all day. The first rule of weight loss surgery is "Protein First" and rule number three is "No Snacking." Remembering these rules will help us refrain from snacking on soft processed carbs, a habit that may lead to weight gain for bariatric patients.

    Drinking Liquid with Meals.
    Generally speaking bariatric patients are instructed to cease consumption of liquids 30 minutes before and 30 minutes after eating. In addition they are told to refrain from drinking beverages with meals. The liquid restrictions are intended to keep mealtime focus on a high protein diet of lean animal, dairy and vegetable protein. The high protein food fills the gastric pouch and sustains satiation best when liquid is absent. When we consume beverages with our lean protein meal the food is washed through the gastric pouch before fully digested. Nutrients are lost as food is washed away and hunger returns more quickly. As we advance following weight loss surgery we tend to relax the liquid restrictions because it is not comfortable to eat food without liquid and dinner conversation is difficult with a dry mouth. An occasional small sip of water with meals may be acceptable and is unlikely to cause weight gain. However the return to full drinking with meals almost always leads to a weight loss plateau or eventually weight gain.

    Avoiding the Scale. During the early weeks and months following weight loss surgery patients find themselves weighing frequently because it is exciting to measure our weight loss on the bathroom scale. In fact, for some patients in the phase of weight loss the relationship with the scale becomes a near-obsession. Sadly as life-long dieters bariatric patients intuitively know when the pendulum has swung from losing weight to gaining weight. Avoiding the bathroom scale is a loud red flag warning that weight gain is imminent. This is understandable, we have worked hard for weight loss and avoiding the scale allows us to deny or ignore what we already know: we are gaining weight. Patients who establish a weekly ritual of weighing on the same day of each week at the same time and place tend to be more accountable for weight gain and more likely to correct behaviors leading to weight gain at an early stage. Patients who find them self avoiding the scale are encouraged to engage in self-assessment to identify the cause of weight gain and correct behaviors quickly.

    Before weight loss surgery we are told that gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding (lap-band), or gastric sleeve procedures are only a tool for weight loss. We are instructed to adopt a lifestyle that includes dietary and physical activity modifications. This new lifestyle is to be followed for the rest of our life in order to maintain weight loss and achieve improved health. As much as the surgery is a tool, so are we human prone to the ups and downs we call life. Red flags are also tools -warning tools- that when observed give us opportunity to make a correction and move forward in a favorable direction.

    Article Source:  Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery

    Sunday, August 01, 2010

    Its Back To School Time-do You Have Your Tools Ready?

    Good Morning & Happy August Neighbors!

    Did you thrive in July or did you just survive? I'm on the "survival" list & happy to turn a page on the new month today! August & September are my favorite months of the year; I especially love the excitement of a new school year! fresh notebooks, pens & pencils. Tons... of new things to learn & experience! How about you - are you excited for a new month & new chance to learn? We are all students of life & learning is fun! LivingAfterWLS has several post-Weight Loss Surgery checklists & journaling tools to download for FREE! Now's a great time for a fresh start-Let's get Learning! http://www.livingafterwls.com/downloads.html



    Tools you can download for FREE:
    Quarterly Personal Self Assessment Worksheet
    5 Day Pouch Test Journal
    Day 6 Daily Checklist
    Day 6 Menu Planner
    Fit is It Workout Chart



    From my EzineArticles Collection: Here are three reasons why checklists are helpful to us in our SUCCESSFUL weight management with #WLS! Take a look, then go to the LivingAfterWLS download page to get your FREE checklist & journaling tools designed to help us all in weight management with weight loss surgery! LivingAfterWLS.com/downloads.html

    Three Benefits of Checklists in Successful Weight Management With Weight Loss Surgery
    By Kaye Bailey

    People who undergo surgery for weight loss are often tempted to simply let the surgery do the work for weight loss without making an effort to adapt new healthier diet and fitness habits. But the surgical bariatric patients who wish to achieve weight loss and maintain a healthy weight for years to come will use the surgery as an opportunity to form new habits creating a new healthier way of life. Using checklists to set goals, make a plan, and promote accountability is a key way for weight loss surgery patients to make the most of their surgical opportunity to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight long-term. Here are three benefits checklists provide:

    Map a Plan. We have all been heard saying things like, "I need to lose some weight" or "I need to plan my meals and eat better" or "I really should start exercising." And we know that saying these things seldom puts in motion the actions to accomplish results. The use of checklists can change words to results because they give us a place in which to map a plan. A good checklist will provide an opportunity to set a goal and then outline the steps required to achieve that goal. Just like a well-planned road trip a good check list maps the route for the journey to ensure the destination is reached.

    Establish Accountability. We may not like to admit it as adults, but the simple fact is we perform better when we are held accountable. That includes being personally and possibly privately accountable to our self when pursing goals that are important to us. A good checklist holds us accountable with milestones and deadlines. Saying "I'd like to sign-up for a 5K race," doesn't hold the punch that writing down on a checklist, "Participate in benefit 5K three weeks from today" does. Seeing the goal written down keeps it present in our thoughts and actions. And the best part is that little check box in which we can put a great big X when the goal is accomplished. Accountability with checklists can be a private action, or it may be shared by like-minded people. People with shared goals may wish to share their checklists adding another layer of accountability that is both motivating and empowering.

    Tactile Action. The literal act of holding a checklist, filling-in the blanks, and marking boxes is physically rewarding. But more importantly the act of writing a checklist, marking progress and accomplishing tasks or goals with a it gives us a pause to consider our goals and assess our progress. Effective time management strategies call for small blocks of time set aside to focus exclusively on making checklists, marking progress and noting accomplishment. For effective weight loss and weight management time should be dedicated each day to make and review checklists all the while keeping an eye on our big goals and the route we will take to achieve them.

    Checklists can be as simple or as complicated you make them. When the goal is as important as long-term health and weight management the investment of time and thought in a well executed checklist nets great benefits.

    Kaye Bailey © 2010 - All Rights Reserved

    Article Source: Three Benefits of Checklists in Successful Weight Management With Weight Loss Surgery

    Let me know what you think of our tools -- and what kind of tools you may find helpful! We are ALL in this Together!

    Wednesday, July 28, 2010

    New Articles from LivingAfterWLS

    Three Red Flag Warnings Leading to Weight Gain After Bariatric Surgery
    Before undergoing bariatric surgery for weight loss it is hard to imagine that we could possibly ever become one of "those people" who gain weight after losing it with the help of surgery. Sadly, at some point most patients who have gastric surgery as their last hope for weight loss eventually regain some weight back. It can happen quickly and without fanfare. Link here to learn about three red flags to watch for that may lead to weight regain:

    Three Benefits of Checklists in Successful Weight Management With Weight Loss Surgery
    People who undergo surgery for weight loss are often tempted to simply let the surgery do the work for weight loss without making an effort to adapt new healthier diet and fitness habits. But the surgical bariatric patients who wish to achieve weight loss and maintain a healthy weight for years to come will use the surgery as an opportunity to form new habits creating a new healthier way of life. Read full article

    A Weight Loss Surgery Journal Marks Progress and Healing
    We have heard it all our dieting life: "keep a food journal, it will keep you accountable for what you eat." That advice always failed me, the best I could ever keep a food journal was through breakfast, I did not want to leave written evidence of my eating behavior. But there is one time in my life I kept a journal, words and feelings scribed on the page. Read more:

    Make Grilled Fish a Healthy Part of Your Weight Loss Surgery Diet
    Since weight loss surgery gives us a second chance of leading healthy lives it behooves us to pay attention to what we eat and incorporate things in our limited diet that can aid our health and longevity. Fortunately for us one of the healthiest things we can eat is also weight loss surgery friendly: Fish. Learn more.

    Grilled Lamb With Provence Herbs and Summer Vegetables
    For people following a high protein diet, such as weight loss surgery patients, grilled lamb is an excellent protein source that is low in fat and rich in minerals and nutrients. Marinating the lamb early in the day before grilling yields a flavorful and savory protein the whole family can enjoy. Article & Recipe Here